Category Archives: Jin Shin Jyutsu

What is happening in the world of Jin Shin Jyutsu

A Touching Good-Bye, Part 2

Betsie Haar presents a book review in The Main Central Jin Shin Jyutsu Newsletter, issue Number 62, Fall 2008:

*******************

A Touching Good-Bye, The Gentle Use of Jin Shin Jyutsu® at Times of Critical Illness and Death ~ by Judith B. Andry, M.Ed.

continued…

The second part of the book contains photographs illustrating the hands-on with related text and instructions. For example, there is both a picture showing how to hold left and right Safety Energy Lock 4 and written instructions for doing so. The pictures are black and white, very simple and clear.

The last chapter is self-help for the caregiver, a very welcome addition to the book. Judy suggests holding one’s fingers, the 36 breaths, and the Main Central. She also reprises the favorite self-help of Al Canner, the executive director of the Colorado Hospice Organization, whose personal story appears in an earlier chapter.

Judy is very careful not to overwhelm the reader with too much information. The Main Central self-help is the only complete flow sequence in the book. She’s extremely conscientious in referring the reader who’s interested in learning more to the Scottsdale office, the 5-day seminars, The Touch of Healing, and Mary Burmeister’s self-help books. This is a book you could give to an acquaintance, colleague, or family member without explanation.

“I cannot say enough good things about A Touching Good-By,” writes instructor Philomena Dooley. “It should offer great help and consolation to anyone faced with the loss of a loved one. Just being able to help a loved one at this critical time with a loving touch should do much to allay the feeling of helplessness – while knowing at the same time you are offering great comfort. It is in the best tradition of Jin Shin Jyutsu.”

NOTE: this book is sold through the Scottsdale office.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR: Judy Andry first experienced Jin Shin Jyutsu in 1984 and has been studying and practicing the Art ever since. In 1998 she was asked to become one of three members of the first Jin Shin Jyutsu Advisory Council. She holds a M.Ed. in Guidance and Counseling and worked as an elementary school counselor, had a private counseling practice and lectured on parenting and adolescence. She is the author of two other books – From One Parent to Another; On Adolescence – and Pauses Along the Way. She lives in the French Quarter in New Orleans with her husband, Allain. They are the parents of three children and grandparents to nine grandchildren.

Thank you, Judy.

Thank you, Betsie.

Thank you, Mary.

Thank you, David.

Gassho, Namaste, Blessings

All issues of The Main Central Jin Shin Jyutsu Newsletter are available at http://www.jsjinc.net.

A Touching Good-Bye, Part 1

Betsie Haar presents a book review in The Main Central Jin Shin Jyutsu Newsletter, issue Number 62, Fall 2008:

*******************

A Touching Good-Bye, The Gentle Use of Jin Shin Jyutsu® at Times of Critical Illness and Death ~ by Judith B. Andry, M.Ed.

In Judy Andry’s new book, A Touching Good-Bye, The Gentle Use of Jin Shin Jyutsu at Times of Critical Illness and Death, you’ll find a collection of true stories from Jin Shin Jyutsu instructors and students detailing their experiences with the critically ill and the dying. The tone of her book is compassionate and inspiring, and its simplicity makes the Art accessible to everyone.

The first part of the book includes a preface from Judy where she explains why she wrote this book – “to give a sense of empowerment to those whose loved one is dying.” Even in the best hospitals, with the best medical care, many patients and families suffer a great deal – not just physical pain, but confusion, fear, and isolation. Judy encourages us to gently place our hands on our loved one and guides us into very simple, but very effective, ways to help ease suffering.

David Burmeister contributes a forward to the book and writes that “practicing the Art of Jin Shin Jyutsu during times of critical need can help restore emotional, physical and spiritual harmony so that one can make the transition in the most peaceful way possible.” David also shares the story of his own father’s dying.

This is an intimate book, and the author handles both the difficult subject matter and the emotional openness of the contributors’ stories with great sensitivity. The personal stories are a way for readers not familiar with Jin Shin Jyutsu to identify with the caregivers in the book and feel empowered to help their loved ones. “Judy Andry shows how to support those we love at the time of their death with dignity, respect and exquisite caring.” writes instructor Susan Brooks.

There are chapters on death, anger and fears, and pain. The author doesn’t shrink from very real end of life issues, which is why her small book has such a big heart. And yet it’s not at all depressing – just the opposite. It’s a compassionate, honest, and sweet book that encourages readers to use the Art of Jin Shin Jyutsu in the most trying of circumstances.

A Touching Good-Bye doesn’t promise miracles. There are some amazing stories here, but the majority of them involve giving comfort and peace to the person with the critical illness. “None of us have the power over the life or death of another person, over saving or not saving, over living or dying,” writes Judy. She warns against pushing Jin Shin Jyutsu onto someone who’s not receptive and similarly warns against proselytizing.

To be continued…

A Touching Good-Bye is available at http://www.jsjinc.net.

Dancers Learn the Art of Self-Help Jin Shin Jyutsu, Part 2

Mitzi Adams incorporates Jin Shin Jyutsu Self-Help as an official university course and tells us about it in The Main Central Jin Shin Jyutsu Newsletter, issue Number 59, Winter 2008:

*******************

Dancers Learn the Art of Self-Help Jin Shin Jyutsu

continued…

They also loved the before-and-after rest for hip flexibility. We would have volunteers demonstrate how high they could lift their leg without any warm-up. Then, I’d put the dancers face-down on the mats so they could really palpate the hips at the flexors (the 15s) to feel how tight they were. After holding their 15s for just ten minutes, from the medial to the lateral part of their hips, they stood up and were not only taller, but leg extension became higher. That prompted my colleagues to ask why all the students were lying on their stomachs before dance classes.  I think they thought they were just being lazy, but I could sense the joy in the department and the shifting of energy as the word spread about how to get a higher leg extension (or developpe̒, in dance lingo) and ease back pain at the same time.

Not only could I see the changes in the students’ attitudes, but I also began to witness that “look” of a more harmonized being. I saw the shapes of the dancers change and their minds begin to open to new possibilities. At the end of the semester, I asked that each student would find two people and give them self-help for a project. They were then to write about their chosen people and discuss their progress, if any. When I sat down to read their final evaluations, I was excited  that so many people with a garden variety of symptoms were seemingly better. This got the attention of many of my students, so by the time I asked if any would consider Jin Shin Jyutsu as a possible career, in addition to their dancing, the majority raised their hands. It was confirmation that the Creator’s Art had penetrated deeply.

Prior to the beginning of the course, the students had a chance to see Jin Shin Jyutsu in action after an accident one of the dancers had had the night of a performance. In a rehearsal just prior to the show’s opening, a dancer had fallen and banged his elbow severely. He decided to dance anyway, but as he did, his elbow began to swell, to the point of being able to see it from the audience. Another professor and I were called from our seats in the house to go backstage to help. I choreographed a piece that, coincidentally, put this dancer in a solo role, depicting the fallen souls from the devastation in the Middle East. Now, this dancer…this fallen soul…was living it out because of his injury. With ten other dancers there to lay hands-on, we stacked our hands, left over right, on the swollen elbow. I had another student time us for twenty minutes. Thank goodness  our injured dancer wasn’t performing until after intermission. The pile of sweaty dancers that had just danced my piece were now at work saving the fallen soldier. We all breathed together, and others standing by, got us water and wiped our brows. After twenty minutes, we gently lifted our hands. The small backstage crowd was astonished to see how the golf ball-sized bruise on the dancer’s elbow had shrunk. True, he had taken ibuprofen, but could it have worked to reduce the swelling so much in that short time? I suggested if he wanted to go to the emergency room to not hesitate, but at that point, he felt all right and just wanted to wrap it and dance in the second half of the show. I helped him wrap his elbow and then left him to warm-up for his next dance…the same dance where he fell in rehearsal. I held my little finger as I watched him dance better than I had seen him thus far. Above all, the students witnessed the power of energy and were touched at how profound the experience was. This group of students was all in my piece titled “Ashes & Grace”. The injured soloist was the eagle rising from the ashes with the grace of the corps stretching out their hands. Life living out art and art living out life: The Creator’s Art through compassionate man…

It was groundbreaking for this program to have offered Self-Help Jin Shin Jyutsu, and I am forever grateful for the experience. When I returned from my appointment, I was pleasantly surprised to learn that the students had started a MySpace page for Jin Shin Jyutsu. They even took it one step further and started a Jin Shin Jyutsu club, which will continue at the university with regular meetings. Could I have asked for anything better?

Thank you, Mitzi.

Thank you, Mary.

Thank you, David.

All issues of The Main Central Jin Shin Jyutsu Newsletter are available at http://www.jsjinc.net.

Dancers Learn the Art of Self-Help Jin Shin Jyutsu, Part 1

Mitzi Adams incorporates Jin Shin Jyutsu Self-Help as an official university course and tells us about it in The Main Central Jin Shin Jyutsu Newsletter, issue Number 59, Winter 2008:

*******************

Dancers Learn the Art of Self-Help Jin Shin Jyutsu

Could I have asked for anything better? Doing the two things I love most, teaching dance and the Art of Self-Help Jin Shin Jyutsu all under one roof…? I think not! It was the Spring of 2007 that David Burmeister approved me to teach a Self-Help course for university dance students; a first, I believe, for Jin Shin Jyutsu Self-Help…an approved-for-credit, official university course offered in a dance department. It was at the request of Chair, Nina Nelson, at Western Michigan University’s Dance Department, that I offered the class to the students to enrich their studies. I couldn’t have been more thrilled.

I have had many opportunities in dance departments where I have been a guest artist, to share my knowledge of Jin Shin Jyutsu, and have taught numerous self-help classes to the general public throughout the years. This time was different, however. Since there are no coincidences, I chuckled when I learned that I would have the undivided attention of 23 (our destiny, our future…) eagerly enrolled students for an entire semester, who were there to learn this “touchy-feely” stuff in an academic setting and receive credit for it.

Hired for a one-year appointment as Assistant Professor in Dance, I had the task of bestowing as much information as I could in a year. The position of “Professor” for me, became less about standing up in front of a class, stoically lecturing to bleary-eyed students, but more about teaching students how to hold their bottoms for eliminating lactic acid build-up, and how to lie on the ground face-down, while holding the groin and giving in to gravity. “This will open up your hips,” I told them, “and you’ll end up becoming happier because of it!” The hallways became my classroom as I fielded questions about injuries. I hadn’t even started my official Self-Help course, and the students were already establishing the practice of “put your left hand here, put your right hand there.”

Once the class began in the second semester, most of the students already had some “hands-on” experience, so it was easy for me to parlay right into the material. As my class only met once a week, I designed it to follow a self-help course laid out for three days, and included ways for dancers to zero-in on specific information, such as injury prevention, weight loss, and flexibility.

I saw a transformation in the students in just a few short weeks and got to read in their journals how they had been personally affected by learning the Art. They especially liked to see the before-and-after results while in class. We would measure the 1s; then, I would have them hold the 1s for twenty minutes. They would re-measure afterward and be so surprised at what had happened. “I lost 2 inches!” “I lost 1 inch!” “Hey, I lost 3 inches!” They were their own testimonies and that was all it took to convince them. Dancers will do anything to lose weight, and  in this case, all they needed to do was to hold the insides of their knees!

To be continued…

We have different kinds of fear, have we not? (Part 2)

Scottsdale presents an Extract from 5th Public Talk, Ojai, California 1953, The Collected Works of J. Krishnamurti, Vol. VII, p. 314-315 © 1992 KFA. in The Main Central Jin Shin Jyutsu Newsletter, issue Number 59, Winter 2008:

*******************

We have different kinds of fear, have we not?

continued…

Because the mind itself is the product of fear, whatever the mind does to put away fear only increases it further. So, can one just be aware of one’s fear without being occupied with it, without judging or trying to alter it? To be aware of fear without condemnation does not mean accepting it, taking it to your heart. To be aware of fear without choice is just to look at it, to know there is fear and to see the truth of it. And, seeing the truth of fear dissolves fear. The mind cannot dissolve fear by any action of its own; in the face of fear it must be very quiet; it must know and not act. Please listen to this. One must know that one is afraid, be fully conscious of it without any reaction, without any desire to alter it. The alteration, the transformation, cannot be brought about by the mind; it comes into being only with the perception of truth, and the mind cannot perceive what is true if it is concerned with fear, if it condemns or desires to be rid of it. Any action of the mind with regard to fear only increases fear or helps the mind to run away from it. There is freedom from fear only when the mind, being fully aware of its own fears is not active towards them. Then quite a different state comes into being which the mind cannot possibly conceive or invent.

That is why it is so important to understand the process of the mind not according to some philosopher, analyst, or religious teacher, but as it is actually going on in yourself from moment to moment in all your relationships – when you are quiet, when you are walking, when you are listening to somebody, when you are turning on the radio, reading a book, or talking at table. To be fully aware of oneself without choice is to keep the mind astonishingly alert, and in that awareness there is self-knowledge, the beginning of wisdom. The mind that struggles against fear, that analyzes fear, will never resolve fear, but when there is passive awareness of fear, a different state comes into being in which fear does not exist.

Note: “We [Jin Shin Jyutsu Inc.] refer readers to http://www.jkrishnamurti.org for further readings, audio and video on-line.”

Thank you, Mary.

Thank  you, David.

Gassho, Namaste, Blessings

All issues of The Main Central Jin Shin Jyutsu Newsletter are available at http://www.jsjinc.net.

We have different kinds of fear, have we not? (Part 1)

Scottsdale presents an Extract from 5th Public Talk, Ojai, California 1953, The Collected Works of J. Krishnamurti, Vol. VII, p. 314-315 © 1992 KFA. in The Main Central Jin Shin Jyutsu Newsletter, issue Number 59, Winter 2008:

*******************

We have different kinds of fear, have we not?

Fear exists at different levels of our being: there is the fear of the past, fear of the future, and fear of the present, which is the very anxiety of living. Now, what is fear? Is it not of the mind, of thought? I think of the future, of old age, of poverty, of disease, of death, and of that picture I am afraid. Thought projects a picture which awakens anxiety in the mind, so thought creates its own fear, does it not? I have done something foolish and I don’t want my attention called to it, I want to avoid it, I am afraid of the consequences. It is again a thought process, is it not? I want to recapture the happiness of youth; or perhaps I saw something yesterday in the mountain sunlight which has now escaped me, and I want to experience that beauty again; or I want to be loved. I want to fulfill, I want to achieve, I want to become somebody; so there is anxiety, there is fear. Thought is desire, memory, and its responses to all this bring about fear, do they not? Being afraid of tomorrow, of death, of the unknown, we begin to invent theories that we shall be reborn, that we shall be made perfect through evolution, and in these theories the mind takes shelter. Because we are everlastingly seeking security, we build churches around our hopes, our beliefs and dogmas, for which we are prepared to fight, and all this is still the process of thinking, is it not? And, if we cannot resolve our fear, our psychological block we turn for help to somebody else.

As long as I am thinking in terms of achieving, fulfilling, or not becoming, of dying, I am always caught in fear, am I not? The process of thinking as we know it, with its self-enclosing desire to be successful, not to be lonely, empty – that very process is the seat of fear. And, can the mind which is occupied with itself, which is the product of its own fears, ever resolve fear?

Suppose one is afraid, and one knows the various causes that have brought about fear. Can that same mind, which has produced fear, put aside fear by its own effort? As long as the mind is occupied with fear, with how to get rid of it, with what to do and what not to do in order to surmount it, can it ever be free from fear? Surely, the mind can be free from fear only when it is not occupied with fear, which does not mean running away from fear or trying [to] ignore it. First, one must be fully aware that one is afraid. Most of us are not fully aware, we are only vaguely aware of fear and, if we do come face to face with it, we are horrified; we run away from it and throw ourselves into various activities which only lead to further mischief.

To be continued…

My Awareness of Jin Shin Jyutsu

I’ve noticed that recently many more readers have viewed this site and I think it is timely to share once more about my love for Jin Shin Jyutsu.

I am certified in other modalities but prefer Jin Shin Jyutsu for a couple of reasons: integrity and intent.

What I see as the main difference between these Arts is that my primary function as a Jin Shin Jyutsu practitioner is to teach my clients self-help. I try to follow the example of my predecessors: Master Murai, Haruki Kato, Mary Burmeister, along with the 25 authorized teachers of the Art.

I wondered why there are only 25 teachers. Yes, I am a certified Self-Help teacher, and there are many of us, but why is it so limited as far as teaching the Art itself? I believe it is to maintain the integrity and intent of the Art of Jin Shin Jyutsu.

I’ve only been studying 12 years, and as Mary often said, it is a lifelong study. The more I study the more I realize I know nothing and isn’t it wonderful?

A couple of important points: Mary says that a client should only see the practitioner 3 times for a new project and 6 times for a chronic project. Of course there are exceptions, especially for people new to the Art, but as a general rule, when I was practicing, the client would call for an appointment, I would ask about the project and at the first session I would give the client specific, daily self-help flows for that project. The client would return the following week for a scheduled session. If the client had been doing daily self-help, they were already much improved and might not even need a 3rd session.

Mary always says to practice self-help daily for 7 days and you will begin to experience the healing. I find this to be true. Of course, I’ve had clients who do not want to bother with self-help and choose to pay me for sessions over and over and over and over. Regardless of how I encourage them, they keep coming back needlessly. My middle-aged client with a rare form of blood cancer is another exception. He required many weekly sessions over the course of the first year and he performed self-help daily. His project was a large, scary label. But within two years he was in remission!

Secondly, Haruki Kato suggests that we view disharmonies from three perspectives. He chose to use acupuncture-moxibustion and Chinese herbology for the internal organ system, the body-balancing method (Master Kamei, dec. 1976) for the movement system and Jin Shin Jyutsu for the circulation system. In addition to homeopathic evaluation leading to diet change, my body prefers to use these three methods to maintain harmony: daily Jin Shin Jyutsu self-help, weekly acupuncture and weekly massage therapy. If you know me personally, you know that I have suffered many illnesses, injuries, surgeries and taken many medications over the years. Since discovering the Art of Jin Shin Jyutsu and continually studying, at 70 years old, I am active, engaged in many volunteer activities and prescription medicine-free! Let me hasten to add that when I overdo because I think I’m 25, and my body “complains”, I take advantage of Western Medicine without hesitation, always continuing with my three chosen methods of alternative care. We are blessed with Western Medicine as it helps our bodies to heal themselves more quickly (the body always heals itself), and Jin Shin Jyutsu supports that medical care and helps treatments to be even more effective while helping the body release any toxic aspects of that treatment.

Our wonderful 25 teachers sacrifice to travel all over the world to teach this Art so that we may learn to Now Know ourselves, help ourselves and help our family, friends and animal companions.

My greatest joy was when I taught Self-Help classes (I’m retired now) to later see those students taking the 5-Day classes as they pursued their path of discovery of the truth.

Jin Shin Jyutsu has opened my mind and awareness to quantum physics, numerology, other cultures, history, astronomy, astrology, biology, physiology and so much more. It is about relationships between all these as I formulate my reason to BE: “The purpose of life is to learn, and within that purpose, to love and serve.”

Thank you, Master Jiro Murai.

Thank you, Mary.

Thank you, Haruki Kato.

Thank you to all of the instructors of this Art.

Thank you, David.

Gassho, Namaste, Blessings.