Category Archives: Animals

JSJ Florida Canine Prison Program, Part 3

Adele and Scooter Leas write about “Jin Shin Jyutsu in Florida – Canine Prison Program” in The Main Central Jin Shin Jyutsu Newsletter, issue Number 71, Winter 2011:

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Understanding how FEAR has limited and driven us is such a universal need. I summoned up lots of control not to sob, realizing that Jin Shin Jyutsu had just changed another life!

We shifted gears, moving into a short dog session, holding only the center thirteen/tens, allowing the animals to balance the exhale and the inhale, feeling Unconditional Love and The Limitless Outpouring of the Life Force. I asked the men to explore the quality of their touch, their ability to sense the dogs’ pulses, to use their intuitive communication skills and to play with the idea of working from the “Impersonal Self”. The outcomes were diverse and beautiful.

By the time I left that day, I knew I was wild about this work and began to look for ways to make it an ongoing program. That is where the Mary Burmeister – JSJ International Outreach and Pat Meador came in. I had read about the amazing prison programs that the Outreach foundation was sponsoring in India. I decided to see if they had any ideas about how to proceed with this program. Jeanne Marie Brennan, the foundation coordinator, was open, excited, supportive and well-informed about both JSJ and prisons. After a series of brainstorming calls and emails, Jeanne Marie informed me that the foundation would support this work. That meant I could move forward and develop a real program at the prison. At about this same time, Pat Meador turned ninety. The faculty wanted to honor her and she suggested that they make any contributions to the Outreach foundation. Because of Pat’s love of animals and her family’s work in Search and Rescue, she has requested that her birthday offering support this program.

The other unexpected boost the work received was from the warden of the prison. I requested permission to give a copy of my book, Jin Shin Jyutsu for Your Animal Companion, to interested inmates. I had been told that the books were not allowed because of the metal bindings. This forward thinking warden simply said that the men will change the bindings and each of them will receive a copy to further their studies.

With these bold green lights to continue the work, I returned to the prison today and set out plans for a ten-month intensive program. I asked the men for a commitment. This would include: two classes a month (a combination of book study and hands-on work), daily half-hour self-help/dog sessions, and monthly progress reports. these reports will consist of what they are experiencing, what makes sense, what they and the dogs like and what obstacles they encounter in this new way of “BE-ing” with dogs.

To my amazement all but seven of the eligible men registered. I am so thrilled and looking forward to seeing what happens next. I’ll keep you posted.

Thank you, Adele and Scooter.

Thank you, Mary.

Thank you, David.

Gassho, Namaste, Blessings

All issues of The Main Central Jin Shin Jyutsu Newsletter are available at http://www.jsjinc.net.

JSJ Florida Canine Prison Program, Part 2

Adele and Scooter Leas write about “Jin Shin Jyutsu in Florida – Canine Prison Program” in The Main Central Jin Shin Jyutsu Newsletter, issue Number 71, Winter 2011:

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A short time later, I found myself in a large warehouse-like space with the first of two groups of inmates I would see that day. There were about sixty men in beige scrubs with more tattoos than I had ever seen and thirty Labrador puppies between the ages of eight weeks and thirteen months. The noise and energy level was overwhelming, and while I am used to dog classes starting off more chaotically than human JSJ classes, I was pretty unsure about this. You know the percentage of men in most JSJ classes. Now I was the only female in sight. And the vast majority of dogs who come to my normal classes are older, often with arthritis and hip issues. “Keep exhaling,” I told myself.

I had the men sit, dogs at their feet, and start by focusing on their own breath, something that was completely new to many of them. Exhale down the front – let go. Inhale up the back – receive the purified, unlimited abundance of the universe. (Would they ever believe there was unlimited abundance?) Suggesting that they “Give themselves a big hug” felt like pushing it, so I asked them instead to hold their right thumbs. Mary tells us, “The THUMBS are like leaders in a parade. If the THUMB is not in rhythm, then all that follow the leader will get out of step, out of harmony. (Self-Help Book III: page 27) I asked them to bow their heads and close their eyes. One hundred twenty eyes stared back at me like I was crazy. So, I said, “O.K., I get it. You don’t close your eyes in prison, huh? Well, that’s O.K., I understand. The reason I asked you to close your eyes was to turn your focus inward instead of outward. You can do that with your eyes open.” Then slowly, quietly, we moved through holding each finger on the right hand, as I explained harmonizing the attitudes. And a miracle happened. Shoulders started dropping, some eyelids fluttered and closed. The very air in the room seemed to change, and with that the dogs all relaxed, resting quietly, some slumbering, even snoring.

I then asked the men to turn their focus to their left hands – to the past – and to reflect on which attitude many have presented the biggest challenge to them in their lives. I asked them to gently but firmly hold the corresponding finger to help harmonize that attitude of the past. There was a large man seated in front of me. Every inch of his arms and hands was covered in tattoos, and he looked very intimidating. I was spellbound as I watched him hold his left hand out and hover undecidedly between his index and middle fingers. In a few moments, he grasped his left index finger; his shoulders sank and a huge audible exhale escaped from him.

To be continued…

JSJ Florida Canine Prison Program, Part 1

Adele and Scooter Leas write about “Jin Shin Jyutsu in Florida – Canine Prison Program” in The Main Central Jin Shin Jyutsu Newsletter, issue Number 71, Winter 2011:

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Sitting in a seaside cafe, sipping hot tea and thrilled to be tucked in away from the teeming rain, I can reflect on my day. I have an awareness of feeling humble and thankful for things I so often take for granted. Mostly I am thankful for my ability to feel peace radiating through my body with each breath. I feel profoundly thankful for the freedom this Art has given me. I feel thankful that my passion for sharing this Art with humans and other animals has set my life on a course of a constantly changing and evolving wonder. I am also thankful for the large group of inmates who just enrolled in an intensive program of Jin Shin Jyutsu (JSJ) self-help and canine work based on the self-help work.

Today, (September 21, 2010) was my sixth trip to Bay Correctional Facility in Panama City, Florida. They have a program where the inmates train puppies to become search and rescue dogs and bomb sniffers. This intensive program partners inmates and pups in a living and training regimen round the clock before the dogs graduate. These doggie graduates are serving throughout the U.S. and around the world. They are in airports, on trains, at natural disaster sites, working security details and serving alongside our soldiers in war zones. Prior to the inmates’ involvement, the training success with these dogs leveled out at about twenty-five percent. Now, with the dedication, unlimited time and attention of the inmates, the success rate with the dogs is up to an unprecedented eighty-five percent.

The local paper ran an article about my work with JSJ as part of the rehabilitation of the pit bulls rescued from Michael Vick’s dog fighting kennels, who now live at Best Friends Animal Sanctuary in Kanab, Utah. After that, I was contacted by Sharon Gavin, Canine Program Director at the prison in Florida. She said she would love to talk with me about the work, because she had a feeling it could help the dogs and inmates. She said that the biggest challenge for many of the men was to bond with another living being and to be responsible caregivers for a high energy pup. And by the way, there was unfortunately no pay. We set up a visit for the next week, after I explained that I only taught one way. The men would have to do self-help to center themselves and to understand the process a bit before I would instruct them in working with the dogs.

I went through the security clearance process, and somewhat apprehensively headed off to prison. Sharon had told me it was a “medium security prison”. I asked what that meant, and she said, “murder on down.” I then asked what “high security” meant, and she state, “premeditated murder and serial killers.” I was only somewhat reassured by this information. the two-hour drive was filled with conscious deep breaths and many repetitions of the Loving Kindness prayer.

To be continued…

Prayer for Loving Kindness

May I be filled with loving kindness. May I be well. May I be peaceful and at ease. May I be happy.

May you be filled with loving kindness. May you be well. May you be peaceful and at ease. May you be happy.

May all beings be filled with loving kindness. May all be well. May all be peaceful and at ease. May all be happy.

Abby

Julianne Dow  writes about “Abby” in The Main Central Jin Shin Jyutsu Newsletter, issue Number 71, Winter 2011:

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The Catskill Animal Sanctuary is a rescue haven for abused and neglected farm animals located in Saugerties, New York. There are horses, cows, goats, rams, sheep, pigs, geese, ducks, turkeys, chickens and rabbits in residence, being treated and cared for with the hopes that they will find nurturing forever homes. Julianne Dow is a Jin Shin Jyutsu practitioner who shares the art with the animals on the farm, helping in their treatment.

Abby is a white horse that was rescued by the Catskill Animal Sanctuary and brought to the farm for caring and rehabilitation. Her hooves were never filed as a young horse, which led to serious leg projects. One morning at the sanctuary, I started treating Abby with a 3/15 quickie on both sides, which is for general well-being, back, hips and legs. I also gave her an 11/25 quickie on both sides which is for elbows, wrist, hooves, skeletal balance and rejuvenation. I have learned from my work with animals that they will show you what they need if you watch and listen.

As I was finishing these quickie flows on Abby, she reached her mouth around to scratch an area on her back. I then put my hand there to scratch the place for her. She began to relax and moan. I then moved my hands to feel her scapula (angel wings) from top to bottom, slowly combing and holding each area that represents each Depth, just how Jin Shin Jyutsu instructors Sara Harper and Anita Willoughby showed me (6th and 3rd on the top part of the scapula, 5th and 2nd in the middle, 4th and 1st on the bottom). As I was doing this, Abby stretched her neck forward and sideways, reaching out in all directions. She began to rock forward and backward. For a minute I thought she was going to topple over as she picked up on her rhythmic swaying. Usually horses rock slowly side to side during Jin Shin Jyutsu sessions, not forward and backward…

This was a unique experience! When she finally became still, I finished by holding her 5/16s up to her 8s on both rear legs while also hold her 15 to help with leg discomfort. I ended as I always do, squatting at her forelegs and holding her 26 and foreleg bone accumulations. This is when she rubs her muzzle in my hair every time. Abby gave me the gift of following her lead to give her what she needed.

Thank you, Julianne.

Thank you, Mary.

Thank you, David.

Gassho, Namaste, Blessings

All issues of The Main Central Jin Shin Jyutsu Newsletter are available at http://www.jsjinc.net.

Puffy’s Story, Part 3

Jenny Swiecicki tells us all about Puffy in The Main Central Jin Shin Jyutsu Newsletter, issue Number 59, Winter 2008:

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Nine is the end of a cycle and the seed of a new beginning; it’s about letting go, allowing change and transformation through the movement of the breath. Nine is also the positive number for 2nd Depth, meaning that when 2nd Depth is in harmony, it vibrates at a 9. The role of the 2nd Depth is to bring total harmony to body, mind and spirit. In dying, Puffy gave me an example of harmonious 9s, becoming breath, being the change and being Trust.

Eleven is the positive number for the 7th Depth, which is the universal Light that is infinitely available to us. The quality of unconditional love and light present at Puffy’s death was nothing other than divine, the 7th Depth Light. Elevens also help us to let go of excess baggage and unnecessary burdens, so we can create space for divine will at the 12s. Although she’d been through a lot in this life, Puffy didn’t hold on to any story about those things; she was able to leave it all behind and be present in the divine.

Seven represents perfect life power, and is the positive number for the 5th Depth. Fifth Depth in harmony allows us to arise into our spiritual inheritance. In living, Puffy brought joy to everyone who knew her, a gift to all of our 5th Depths. I am happy for her that she’s moved on into the cosmic light that is her inheritance. She also taught me that the perfect life power of the 7s does not end with death; it continues living in a beautiful, universal way.

When I add up the date, 9/11/2007, it comes to a 2, which is life force, wisdom for all creatures. Puffy was one of my greatest teachers, deeply embodying much of the philosophy and wisdom of Jin Shin Jyutsu. I am profoundly changed and blessed by knowing her, and having shared this last part of her life and death. I believe that all four-leggeds have much to teach us humans, if only we are able to humble ourselves and really listen.

Although I miss and grieve her, I too feel the seed of a new beginning inside myself coming alive. It was no surprise that two days after she died, I “accidentally” cut both my ring fingers! (…one while working in the garden, and the other while cooking.) So I am holding them and exhaling. I would like to learn to live life more and let go of trying to live, or of being afraid to live.

A line from a song I learned during a retreat with Thich Nhat Hanh comes to mind as I close this story: “Birth and death are only doors through which we cross, sacred thresholds on our journey, birth and death are a hide and seek game.” Thank you, Puffy, for playing with me in this game of life, and for teaching me to live fully and to BE the Joy! Your precious spirit  will always be remembered and continues to live in innumerable ways.

Thank you, Jenny.

Thank you, Mary.

Thank you, David.

Gassho, Namaste, Blessings

All issues of The Main Central Jin Shin Jyutsu Newsletter are available at http://www.jsjinc.net.

Puffy’s Story, Part 2

Jenny Swiecicki tells us all about Puffy in The Main Central Jin Shin Jyutsu Newsletter, issue Number 59, Winter 2008:

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Towards the end of the summer, Puffy’s vitality dropped slightly, and her breathing began to get a bit wheezy. Once again I offered Jin Shin Jyutsu, and she accepted. She slept like an angel through more than one Kidney Flow, her little body receiving peacefully. I used the Kidney Flow to support her life energy and lungs. I also used the Spleen, the 26 and 13 Flows. I began a daily routine with her, but soon had to leave for a family trip to Michigan, leaving Puffy home with Jim.

A week later, on the evening of my return, I got a message from Jim saying that Puffy wasn’t doing well. She stopped eating that afternoon and seemed pretty fatigued and wobbly. When I arrived home late that night, she was curled up on a blanket, her energy pulled very inward. I sensed that she was getting ready to die, and told her, “Puffy, if you are getting ready to go, I will support you in that.” I also told her that if she wanted to stay, I’d support that, too.

Through the night and the next day, Puffy’s small body continued to slow down. I brought her to the vet in the afternoon and they put her on fluids to ease the shock of the process for her. When I went into the back to see her, she wiggled her little tail when I said her name.

We had to leave her there for a few hours, which was hard, but it gave me time to eat, rest, and get a bed ready for her. Jim and I picked her up just before 8:00;  I could tell she was close to dying. I held her in my arms on the way home, then let her lie on the bed I’d made for her in front of the altar. Jim held her 4s and I held opposite paws. We sang songs and gave her lots of love. I got up for a minute, and Puffy took her last breath while Jim was still holding her 4s. It was so peaceful, that last breath and the way the life moved from her body. We both kept our hands on her for a while, feeling the pulses and witnessing the way that death is such a remarkable transition. This was shortly after 9 p.m. I believe it was somewhere between 9:11 and 9:15, on 9/11/07.

So little Puffy, in her 9th year, in the 9th month, and in the 9th hour of that evening began her journey into a new beginning. And what a day to choose…9/11/07!

To be continued…

Puffy’s Story, Part 1

Jenny Swiecicki tells us all about Puffy in The Main Central Jin Shin Jyutsu Newsletter, issue Number 59, Winter 2008:

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An angel came into my life this year, in the form of a small, white, fluffy dog named Puffy. She found me, literally jumped into the open door of my car one day while running from the puppy farm she’d been sent to after her previous owner, Mr. Glen, had died. For me it was love at first sight. Although she wasn’t young, Puffy embodied a purity of spirit and an innocence that is rare.

She’d had a rough life, as I found out from the folks in this small town, Tennessee. She’d been bred her entire life, and now at the age f 9 she had mammary tumors and as the town vet said, “troubles down there”. In our first days together she’d frequently urinate inside my cabin. I didn’t know how I’d be able to bring an incontinent doggy back to live with me in my apartment in Oakland, where the landlords had already made a one-time exception for my cat.

During this time, I gave Puffy several 13 Flows to help calm her anxiety and clear some of the trauma from her body. She accepted the sessions gratefully, soaking them in and falling asleep with paws outstretched. After a week or so, she stopped peeing indoors. Shortly thereafter her right eye swelled up, and I used both the liver and eye flows to clear the swelling. After three more weeks in Tennessee, Puffy returned with me on the plane to California, a whole new world for her! We fell more deeply in love, sharing daily walks and constant companionship.

However, now when I’d offer Jin Shin Jyutsu, Puffy would refuse or squirm away after just a few minutes. She was always very clear about what she needed, which gave me the opportunity to simply BE present, and to allow her to BE as well. I wanted to help her clear her tumors with Jin Shin Jyutsu, but Puffy taught me that she did not need to be “fixed”. She was perfect as she was.

Although she had various health projects, her attitude was always positive. She experienced incredible joy running on the beach, taking our neighborhood walks and digging for ground squirrels. She never made a big fuss about her pains; she just rested when she needed. There were a few times hiking together when she’d just sit down on the trail and let me know she’d had enough. During our last camping trip, she was stung by a yellow jacket, and immediately jumped into my truck and made a nest of blankets in which to rest and recuperate. I learned so much from her simplicity and wisdom; she really became a role model for me. Puffy made it up a 7,300 foot mountain with my boyfriend Jim and me on that trip, taking her time and resting in the shade whenever possible. I think she did this hike with us only because of her unconditional devotion to me.

To be continued…

Lessons Come In All Sizes, Part 2

Gail Okray & Carol Welhouse submit an article: Lessons Come In All Sizes in The Main Central Jin Shin Jyutsu Newsletter, issue Number 56, Spring 2007:

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Needless to say there was a fair amount of nervousness with the decision to have another litter a year and a half later. Progesterone levels were taken weekly beginning at week 2. The levels stayed in normal range throughout the pregnancy. Frieda asked for Jin Shin Jyutsu sessions regularly, especially when there was a hormone shift and the levels of progesterone were on the lower end of the normal range for pregnancy.

On day 56, with only 4 days to go, she began acting like a dog that is ready to whelp. The outlook for surviving pups born before day 58 is bleak, since one week of a dog’s pregnancy is equivalent to one month of a woman’s pregnancy. This birth would be 4 weeks early.

Main Central and Spleen Flows throughout the night kept labor from progressing (Philomena’s Mothers, Babies and Children Class). A trip to the vet for a check-up the next afternoon showed whelp was eminent. Since these pups were now 3 days early, the decision was made to let the dog go into full labor before the c-section to allow the pups maximum time in utero. Since Frieda likes her vet, she chose a late evening slot for this surgery and not the middle of the night. As I left with her to meet the vet at the clinic, I prayed I would bring the little bundles home. They were true preemies with no hair on their legs from the wrist and ankles to the toes, none on the ears and very thin hair on the body. As they ate and grew, I noticed on the boy a protrusion where the umbilical cord was attached and hardness under it. I tried right hand down, left on top several times a day and in a matter of days all was normal.

My sister (also a Jin Shin Jyutsu practitioner) came for a visit. It is amazing what a new set of eyes sees. As we talked I mentioned that I was a little concerned with the girl’s breathing and coloring in the face. Her jumper cables went into action.

November 29, 2006 – Puppies! With eyes open so Mom will let me touch them, Katara lies on her back and appears to have respiratory challenges. When held, she raises the left front paw, “I would like a Left 3 Flow, please.” Fitting in the palm of my hand while lying on her back, she receives the first step of the Left 3 Flow, moving through the four fingers individually, then the first step of the Right 3 Flow, repeating the same sequence of fingers during the session. Her hind feet ran and her body wiggled as she came into rhythm.

Several hours later, she raised the left paw again, and I repeated the Left 3 Flow. This time the pulse came in quickly, finishing the flow. We marveled at the changes which occurred: looser skin on the neck and shoulders as congestion decreased, pink belly, pink nose, and the jaw receded to its proper position, and of course breathing harmonized. She lost the “stuffed sausage” look, and the skin looked wrinkled and she wiggled. It was a truly amazing transformation.

Momo participated in the healing process; he held Katara’s 2s or 3s in the whelping box. By the next morning, “Miss Wiggle Butt” crawled in the whelping box, yawned, smiled and squeaked, just like a normal puppy.

Thinking of the 3 Flow, relationships spring into mind, like the breathing relationship of exhale to inhale, the relationship of bones in the jaw for free movement, the relationship of all aspects of the digestive tract, birthplace of the Mediator, the relationship of puppy to environment, and the relationship between Mom and Momo.

Boston Terrier owners have a saying, “Boston’s are love in a black and white wrapper.” This is our black and white lesson.

Thank you, Gail.

Thank you, Carol.

Thank you, Mary.

Thank you, David.

Gassho, Namaste, Blessings

All issues of The Main Central Jin Shin Jyutsu Newsletter are available at http://www.jsjinc.net.

Lessons Come In All Sizes, Part 1

Gail Okray & Carol Welhouse submit an article: Lessons Come In All Sizes in The Main Central Jin Shin Jyutsu Newsletter, issue Number 56, Spring 2007:

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Nine weeks of anticipation were over, and we had two healthy Boston Terrier pups, one boy, Momo (…a true Jin Shin Jyutsu puppy; located on his back is a white arrow showing the direction of the energy going up the back…) and one girl, Katara. As the veterinarian looked at the two products of this recent cesarean section, he raised a simple question. “What did you do differently with this litter than the last one?” Gail’s answer: “A year and a half of Jin Shin Jyutsu.” An open-minded guy, his response was a smile, “Well, Gail, it seemed to work.”

Mom Frieda has been Gail’s teacher from the moment of birth and reminds her often not to be too serious (an insight about her 15s). As a young pup practicing for the show ring, she would often get into a bit of mischief. One day when Frieda was about 9 months old, Gail saw Frieda running toward her from down the hallway, her head twisted to one side. At that age, Frieda’s favorite pastime was to take the bath sponge from the bathtub and hide it, just so you knew she had been in there. Well, this time Frieda must have hit her head on the tub, injuring the side of her head and ear. With an hour before the veterinarian’s office closed, there were no appointments available that afternoon to examine her. A veterinarian from the office would see Frieda in the morning before regular client hours.

With an upcoming dog show just days away, it was Jin Shin Jyutsu to the rescue. Frieda lay on the table as Gail started an opposite Kidney Flow to the ear in distress. Frieda was quiet as a mouse. The areas pounded for a long time before harmony began to take place. One half hour later as she followed me from my treatment room, she walked with an ever-so-slight tilt of her head but had no appetite to eat her evening meal. I applied my jumper cable for a few minutes several times that evening as she lay on the couch next to me. By 10 p.m. she was ready for something to eat. What a pleasant surprise the next morning when she bounded out of bed like nothing ever happened! A quick check at the veterinarian’s office showed a slight inflammation of the inner ear. I continued the Kidney Flow for the next few days, and she went on to win points toward her championship the day of the show.

When Frieda was two years old, after searching for 6 months for a stud dog, I found a match for her. Usually 21 to 28 days after breeding, a pregnancy check is performed at the veterinarian’s office. There were two pups on ultrasound and all seemed well. A dog’s gestation period is 58 to 65 days, but my breed generally has a 60 to 61 gestation. On Day 43 Frieda didn’t look well and her sides were sunken in. A trip to the vet included ultrasound and a progesterone test drawn. The result of the progesterone test was 12.5 nanograms per milliliter. (A dog cannot sustain a pregnancy when the levels drop below 5 nanograms per milliliter, with a normal level being over 20 nanograms per milliliter.) The ultrasound indicated one of the pups was not doing well. Progesterone was then supplemented for the rest of the pregnancy. Day 53 brought along another occurrence with the ultrasound revealing the loss of a pup. A c-section was done on day 61, delivering a big girl pup.

To be continued…

Jin Shin Jyutsu for Your Animal Companion, Part 2

Adele Leas shares her experience with animals: “Jin Shin Jyutsu for Your Animal Companion”, in The Main Central Jin Shin Jyutsu Newsletter, issue Number 47, Winter, 2005:

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Sharing Jin Shin Jyutsu with other species has expanded my understanding of Universal Energy in whole new ways. It is because of experiences like this morning that I have spent the last eight years focused on sharing Jin Shin Jyutsu with domesticated animals. This past August I published a book, Jin Shin Jyutsu© for Your Animal Companion, so that others might experience this joy firsthand. The book is based on Mary Burmeister’s beautiful Jin Shin Jyutsu Self-Help Books 1 and 2, which are said to contain the essence of the “Art of the Creator through Compassionate Man”.

The book is really a “picture book” with color diagrams of each step of the flows, showing the adaptations needed to easily work with different size species including: dogs, horses, cats, birds, rabbits, and hamsters. Kim Bremermann has done a beautiful job with the computer graphics and designing the pages to make them clear and accessible, with hands showing the location of each step.

If you follow the pictures, you do not need to face the lifelong challenge of knowing your right hand from your left! I have adapted the flows as needed for different species based on the relationship of the Safety Energy Locks and the prime numbers. The book also discusses attitudinal and physical differences needed to make the work accessible to our furry friends. This work has evolved over the past decade from my own practice and my animal classes taught through the U.S. and Europe. The bulk of the flow texts are translated by Matthias Roth into German and French, in addition to the English.

The book, originally designed as a workbook to accompany the classes, now stands on its own as an introduction to the work. It is possible to continue exploring through my classes, private sessions and phone consultations.

I now also have a website, http://www.jsjforyouranimal.com where you can find out more about this work, as well as check out class schedules and print registration forms for classes and order forms for the book. The cost of the book is $25.00, plus shipping/handling, available through the Scottsdale office. While at the website, take the time to look at the photo gallery. I do not think you will have any trouble guessing which horse is Cali.

I find that animals are more in tune and more sensitive to touch than many humans are. Working with the animals can refine your touch and heighten your sensitivity. Intuitive, inter-species communication is a natural outcome when you understand the idea that you are not doing anything but rather “BE-ing with this BE-ing in this gentle and loving Art”. Learning to send this message from your heart through your hands is the primary focus of my classes, the website and the book. I believe you and your animals will find it deeply rewarding to share this journey.

animalbook-lg

 

This book, as well as all copies of The Main Central Jin Shin Jyutsu Newsletter, is available at http://www.jsjinc.net.

Thank you Adele.

Thank you, Mary.

Thank you, David.

Gassho, Namaste, Blessings