Monthly Archives: March 2018

I’m thinking about fear…

FEAR LIVES IN THE FUTURE

“We can’t fear the past. Fear is a future thing. And since the future’s all in our heads, fear must be a head thing.”
— Tom Payne

It helps to understand that fear is usually a projection into the future. We typically fear what MIGHT happen rather than what is happening now.

Susan Jeffers notes that 90% of what we fear usually does not materialize. So replace your images of disaster on the TV screen in your mind with awareness of what is really happening. And don’t allow your thinking to change channels.

“I have not ceased being fearful, but I have ceased to let fear control me.”
— Erica Jong

Copyright © 1999 – 2018 Higher Awareness Inc.
Edmonton, AB, Canada T5K 0K6

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Surrender to the Unknown, Part 2

Jill Pasquinelli writes: “Surrender to the Unknown” in The Main Central Jin Shin Jyutsu Newsletter, issue Number 81, Summer 2013:

Guidance: priorities of the Spirit, Soul and Body

continued…

For me this is Jin Shin Jyutsu, moving us closer to our true selves, to be in alignment with the creator, nature, myself and the universe…to be a reflection of light back to the cosmos.

Another client, Terry, came to see me for depression. This was many years ago. I still see Terry today. At the time she came to see me, her father was dying, and she was dealing with breast cancer. She loved the Jin Shin Jyutsu treatments and told me they helped her to be in her body, and she always felt uplifted after a treatment. Over the years of treating Terry, life happened as it often does. Her husband went through prostate cancer, her mother was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s, her daughter got married, she retired, and they sold the family house and moved up north to the country. This is a lot of movement…all significant things, but I watched Terry handle it all and take it in stride with ease, grace and humor. I thought I would be seeing her a lot less because she now lives an hour and fifteen minutes away but it has become clear to me that Jin Shin Jyutsu is a way of life for her. She continues to come for her weekly appointment. She is growing a large beautiful garden, and has gotten into art – something she has wanted to do for a long time but didn’t feel confident. She is happy and content and has the flexibility and resilience to deal with what life hands her.

I see another person, Polly, who is living with rheumatoid arthritis. I’ve been seeing her for eleven years now. She has had many ups and downs with pain, medication and fatigue. She has had to give up things that she has cherished like yoga and her long walks. She struggles daily, and yet I know few people as fiery with life as Polly. We often laugh at the absurdity and irony of life; in fact, I think I’ve laughed harder with Polly than with anyone. Sometimes we have tears rolling down our cheeks during a session we’re laughing so much. As Polly’s disease has limited her body, her spirit, mind, and heart have opened and continue to be what I call a savage gift. I remember Mary saying, “A person’s thoughts can change, sometimes the body follows.” …But not always, as I’ve come to see. I remember one man when asked the question, “How are you doing today?” replied, “The spirit is well but the body is not so good.”

A woman called me several years ago because she had ovarian cancer. She told me that since she had started chemotherapy she wasn’t able to function at all. She couldn’t get out of bed, had no appetite and wasn’t able to work, even though she could work from home. The reason she wanted to come for Jin Shin Jyutsu was because she didn’t want her hair to fall out from the chemotherapy. I told her I wasn’t sure the Jin Shin Jyutsu could prevent the hair loss, in fact, probably not. But I was pretty sure it would help her to feel better. She paused, then decided to make an appointment for a session. After her first treatment she was able to get up out of bed and eat something. She came to see me two more times and each time felt better. Her appetite was growing, she started working part-time and had more energy. In general she was feeling much better. Before her fourth treatment she called to cancel her appointment. She told me the Jin Shin Jyutsu wasn’t working. Her hair was starting to fall out. I pointed out how much better she was doing, but she felt the Jin Shin Jyutsu had failed her. I never saw her again.

The body has it’s priorities as does the spirit, soul, mind, and heart. The route is not always direct and the journey is unknown. We always remain unfinished as we always live in an imperfect world. How perfect is that design for our growth and transformation?

As one client said, “Jin Shin Jyutsu hasn’t helped my stomach pain but all the rest of my life is better.”

Thank you, Jill.

Thank you, Mary.

Thank you, David.

Gassho, Namaste, Blessings

All issues of The Main Central Jin Shin Jyutsu Newsletter are available at http://www.jsjinc.net.

 

I’m thinking about struggling…

STOP THE BATTLES

“When you fight something, you’re tied to it forever. As long as you’re fighting it, you’re giving it power.”
— Anthony de Mello

What are you fighting?

Resistance always brings pain. Examine your struggle. What does your personality want from the situation? What does your soul want? What can you learn from this?

Always strive to mend separation and achieve unity. Always choose love over fear. If you can embrace whatever you are struggling against, the struggle will disappear.

“What you resist persists. And only what you look at, and own, can disappear. You make it disappear by simply changing your mind about it.”
— Neale Donald Walsch

Copyright © 1999 – 2018 Higher Awareness Inc.
Edmonton, AB, Canada T5K 0K6

Surrender to the Unknown, Part 1

Jill Pasquinelli writes: “Surrender to the Unknown” in The Main Central Jin Shin Jyutsu Newsletter, issue Number 81, Summer 2013:

Guidance: priorities of the Spirit, Soul and Body

We never really know what brings someone to us for a Jin Shin Jyutsu session. It’s usually a condition or symptom, something that we don’t want, but there’s something else underlying that, something unspoken, unidentified, not yet seen or known. Maybe it’s the soul calling us back to ourselves.

One thing I know for sure is the healing process is one of mystery, it’s movements often unpredictable, taking us to unforeseen places and foreign territories only unfamiliar because we don’t  recognize them as our own landscape. There is no one path or clear path or a path at all really, just the one we are making while we travel this vast terrain of the psyche and soul. I think it’s the soul’s journey. When we’re in this kind of movement of our entire being, we often wrestle with this unknown and unfamiliar place, wanting what is familiar, wanting things to be clear and certain, ordered and predictable but that’s not usually how the process of transformation goes. We can’t see clearly because we’re inside of the experience, it’s being revealed to us as we experience it. There’s also no timeline, no way to know when we’ll be out of this, but whether we surrender or fight it, at some point we emerge from this place and it’s as if the light shines on us so we can reorient ourselves, have some perspective, have an authentic experience of who we are now, and yet we recognize we are unfinished.

This is the movement of our life. What calls us, whether it’s a loss, an illness, a memory, a birth, a death, whatever it may be.

I think of my client who came to see me because she had liver cancer and was given a six month prognosis. Rita was a nun and had a deep spiritual life but struggled with depression. Something was missing for her. I treated Rita for four and a half years. She was a closet poet, and often we would start her sessions with a poem she had written. She confessed to me that the prognosis the doctors had given her “was always on the back burner” as she put it. In the face of her fears and struggles I watched Rita blossom over the years. She began having public poetry readings, and this guided her into leading prayer groups in her community. As she was helping others and an inspiration to all of us, she took a big leap and did something she had always wanted to do, which was get her Master’s in psychology. I watched and witnessed Rita becoming more herself, moving into an inherently earned freedom as she navigated the unknown, finding herself along the way, living and expressing the beauty that was Rita. As she was moving into the dying process, one day she said to me “Jill, this has been the happiest and best four and a half years of my life. I found what was missing, and it was me!” We both cried, we both came to understand she was free from the past and the future. It didn’t matter anymore, she was whole. She could let go of her life easily and she did.

To be continued…

I’m thinking about solutions…

PROBLEMS OR SOLUTIONS?

“If you expect the best, you will be the best. Learn to use one of the most powerful laws in this world; change your mental habits to belief instead of disbelief. Learn to expect, not to doubt. In so doing, you bring everything into the realm of possibility.”
— Dr. Norman Vincent Peale

Stop and be aware! Have you been thinking about what you want or what you don’t want?

It’s so easy to lock our minds onto problems rather than opening to receive solutions. But what we think is what we get. This is so important! If we continually focus on problems and negatives, that’s where we’ll stay.

“No pessimist ever discovered the secrets of the stars, or sailed to an uncharted land, or opened a new heaven to the human spirit.”
— Helen Keller

Copyright © 1999 – 2018 Higher Awareness Inc.
Edmonton, AB, Canada T5K 0K6

Jin Shin Jyutsu in Psychiatric Care: A Case History, Part 2

Eika Bingden writes about: “Jin Shin Jyutsu in Psychiatric Care: A Case History” in The Main Central Jin Shin Jyutsu Newsletter, issue Number 76, Spring 2012:

The participants clearly enjoyed the self-help exercises and received a relaxing and profound effect from the beginning when they did some of the self-help sequences on each other. From time to time the initial skepticism decreased; first reports were given at the second meeting of the group, and may participants considered how they could already integrate Jin Shin Jyutsu into their lives and their work. At the third and fourth event, one could sense that the spark of enthusiasm was ignited for most of them.

By the way, the participants received credit points from the hospital for this training course.

Following, the head of the nursing service, Ms. Jüttner, who looks upon this project benevolently, was asked by the participants to relate to the physicians and therapists that the nurses want the doctors to be informed about our project and the general ideas about Jin Shin Jyutsu.

At short notice we were given a twenty-minute opportunity during the weekly meetings of physicians and therapists to introduce Jin Shin Jyutsu and our present experience with it. We especially emphasized the simplicity combined with high effectiveness and the self-help aspect. During the subsequent short discussion, we also referred to the twenty years of clinical experience of Morristown Memorial Hospital in New Jersey, U.S.A. We got the impression that there is a certain openness for Jin Shin Jyutsu even in the medical profession.

One month later we met again with the training group. This time the question in the foreground was what kind of experience had been gained and what help was still required in order to employ the knowledge. Besides the valuable personal experiences, there were actually several reports where Jin Shin Jyutsu had been employed in certain cases.

Especially in physiotherapy and on a ward for people suffering from depression, the nurses had started to offer a Jin Shin Jyutsu session to several patients and, without exception, had received  positive feedback. Again we summed up the most important principles for the application of Jin Shin Jyutsu and outlined extensively the content of Mary’s three introductory books, thus encouraging those present to “simply” start.

In the meantime, a further month had passed by, and we had another discussion with the very committed head of skill enhancement, Ms. Machner, and the head of the nursing department, Ms. Jüttner. Both are great supporters of this action. In a detailed way they reported about the first beginnings which individual participants of the further training had described. Besides, a group already exists which meets on a monthly  basis in order to exchange experiences. Many wish to attend a 5-Day Basic Seminar soon. We discussed the realization of this wish financially.

Within the coming six months, all experiences which have been gained in the use of Jin Shin Jyutsu, shall be collected and evaluated. Should the result be significant (which we assume it will!), a long-term project can be envisioned.

A beginning has been made!

Thank you, Eika.

Thank you, Mary.

Thank you, David.

Gassho, Namaste, Blessings

All issues of The Main Central Jin Shin Jyutsu Newsletter are available at http://www.jsjinc.net.

I’m thinking about precious moments…

THEN AND NOW

“Time is not a line, but a series of now points.”
— Taisen Deshimaru

We understand time as a continuum. Our memories link the moments of the past and our imaginations draw on the patterns of our memories to project the future.

If we leave the movies of the mind behind, time can only be experienced now — moment by precious moment. Open in awareness to what is happening right now. Appreciate all that is. Immerse yourself in the joy and wonder of every now and life will be a gift.

“The responsibility for both present and future is in our own hands. If we live right today, then tomorrow has to be right.”
— Eknath Easwaran

Copyright © 1999 – 2018 Higher Awareness Inc.
Edmonton, AB, Canada T5K 0K6