Monthly Archives: March 2017

Jin Shin Jyutsu is an Art – Thoughts about our Nature and Healing, Part 2

Waltraud Riegger-Krause was inspired to write “Jin Shin Jyutsu is an Art – Thoughts about our Nature and Healing” in The Main Central Jin Shin Jyutsu Newsletter, issue Number 72, Spring 2011:

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Inspired through being in class with Jill Marie Pasquinelli (Holden)

continued…

As soon as we start moving, a profound transformation will take place. Maybe we are not fighting any more, but surrendering into the unknown or even darkness, into the process of transformation. Nobody chooses to get sick; sickness brings change. One is not the same person anymore when one comes out of it. Most of the time we are much stronger.

There is a difference between curing and healing. Healing is seeing the wholeness. Do we see our own wholeness? Am I living in tune with nature? I can only be there for someone else as much as I am there for myself. We don’t have to fix something or change something or someone, but we can make room and space for all they are. If we can be as we are, they can be as they are – fulfill their own karma.

It’s about finding my own Rhythm. Is my own rhythm in tune with the rhythm of Nature, the rhythm of the elements, the seasons, the textures, the cosmic vibrations, the six-pointed star?

One student asked the question: “What do you say to someone who has been practicing Jin Shin Jyutsu for a long time and still gets cancer?”

Jill’s answer was: It comes to the question, does Jin Shin Jyutsu work? Yes it works! It doesn’t always work the way we want it to work. Our lessons, our assignments come to us the way and when they will come. It’s our karma. The question to this person should be, “What has changed in your life?” We don’t know what a soul has to experience and to go through. Many spiritual teachers say sickness is another experience to grow spiritually. We do not get asked how we want to learn our lessons. If we have expectation about Jin Shin Jyutsu, we are limiting ourselves.

Living Jin Shin Jyutsu also means looking at our lifestyle and making changes, living the dream we always wanted to live.

How?

Mary said (paraphrased): If you hold your Ones for an hour a day, your life will change.

We can also do a Mediator Flow, working with the Nines and many more possibilities, depending on what the person needs.

Jill mentioned another guideline she heard from being in class with Mary, which I have also heard from other philosophers and naturopaths:

To support healing, first take two hours, where you do nothing, to shut down all of your senses. Then take two hours of quiet time for Self-Help, meditation, or a walk in silence.

Thank you, Waltraud.

Thank you, Jill.

Thank you, Mary.

Thank you, David.

Gassho, Namaste, Blessings

All issues of The Main Central Jin Shin Jyutsu Newsletter are available at http://www.jsjinc.net.

I’m thinking about the arrogance of ego…

RAISE YOUR AWARENESS

“Few are those who see with their own eyes and feel with their own hearts.”
— Albert Einstein

Take awareness to new levels. Explore experiencing yourself in the act of being aware. Be aware of awareness itself. To do this, we need to go beyond our old mechanical patterns, compulsions and rejections. We need to uproot the arrogance of ego.

Higher awareness is conscious of spirit and form working together. We must be conscious and present within before we can tune in to the guidance of our soul. Develop awareness to hear the subtlest whispers of intuition through your thoughts, feelings and sensations.

“Most of us are in touch with our intuition whether we know it or not, but we’re usually in the habit of doubting or contradicting it so automatically that we don’t even know it has spoken.”
— Shakti Gawain

Copyright © 1999 – 2017 Higher Awareness Inc.
Edmonton, AB, Canada T5K 0K6

Jin Shin Jyutsu is an Art – Thoughts about our Nature and Healing, Part 1

Waltraud Riegger-Krause was inspired to write “Jin Shin Jyutsu is an Art – Thoughts about our Nature and Healing” in The Main Central Jin Shin Jyutsu Newsletter, issue Number 72, Spring 2011:

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Inspired through being in class with Jill Marie Pasquinelli (Holden)

It was last October when Jill came to my hometown Isny in Germany to teach a Special Topic class about critical labels. She touched many aspects of our work with Jin Shin Jyutsu, which I want to share with you along with my own brainstorming.

When we talk about critical labels or illness in general, we come to the question, “Why did I get sick?” “Did I do anything wrong? And if so, what did I do wrong?”

We don’t know.

I don’t think it is because we are doing anything wrong. Life is a journey – spiritual, emotional, physical; unknown; unpredictable…

If we get sick or if any of our clients come with a label, the first thing we can do is to know that it is not about something that went wrong. I think sickness is part of our Being; it is a kind of cleaning, which our higher Nature has forced upon us. It is part of our becoming whole. Healing comes from wholeness.

So maybe we need, or our soul needs, this experience to become more whole. Obviously it forces us to take care of ourselves, to seek people who can help us and for treatments, which can be western medicine, naturopathic medicine, psychological help or Jin Shin Jyutsu. All of these can be necessary to save one’s life. We don’t know why western medicine works; we don’t know why Jin Shin Jyutsu works. It’s all alchemy.

Mary said: “If you have to take medication, say thank you, God, that there is medication for me to help me. Embrace it. Everything comes from God.”

We have the question: “What meaning does the sickness have for me?”

At the beginning we oftentimes do not know. We are so overwhelmed with the diagnosis and with organizing the next step. And we are in a way blind, because we are too much in it. At that stage it is good if we have some family member or close friend to support us.

It’s only afterwards that we will start having glimpses, because then we realize we are not coming back to the same life we had before we got sick.

Also, oftentimes before we get sick, we feel that something is not flowing anymore. There is something inside myself knocking at my unconsciousness and whispering: stop and look, something is missing, something needs to change. We know it but we don’t do anything – until it becomes physical. Now I can feel it; now everybody can see that I need a break to take care of myself. Only when our hidden emotional or spiritual sufferings show in the physical body does it become visible to us and others. And we are forced to act.

“You cannot solve the problem if you’re thinking the same way you were when you created it.”            ~ From “What Mary says…, p. 29 [attributed to Albert Einstein]

to be continued…

I’m thinking about awareness…

OPEN TO AWARENESS

“Mindfulness means moment-to-moment, non-judgmental awareness. It is cultivated by refining our capacity to pay attention, intentionally, in the present moment, and then sustaining that attention over time as best we can. In the process, we become more in touch with our life as it is unfolding.”
— Myla & Jon Kabat-Zinn

Why do we want to become more aware?

If we remain unaware, we:

  • repeat the past,
  • remain stuck in relationships,
  • live superficial, literal and one dimensional lives,
  • lack experiences of love and beauty, and
  • have limited connection to others and the universe.

With awareness, we are fully involved with life. Awareness is sensing deeply and sensitively for what really is. To do this, we need to approach the present as totally new. When we can be open and attentive in each moment, we begin to free ourselves from the conditioning of the past and the suffering that it so often brings.

“If moment by moment you can keep your mind clear then nothing will confuse you.”
— Sheng Yen

Copyright © 1999 – 2017 Higher Awareness Inc.
Edmonton, AB, Canada T5K 0K6

Morristown Memorial Hospital and Jin Shin Jyutsu, Part 2

David Burmeister writes about “Morristown Memorial Hospital and Jin Shin Jyutsu” in The Main Central Jin Shin Jyutsu Newsletter, issue Number 71, Winter 2011:

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continued…

The following morning, Philomena, Susan, Betsie, Joan Millspaugh and I met with Emilie Rowan and some of her  colleagues from the Integrative Care department. We received a tour of their beautiful facility which includes a classroom 5 private treatment rooms and the space to build 5 more. The atmosphere of the entire department is beautiful, soothing and serene. Once you entered it you wouldn’t know you are in a major medical hospital. The treatment rooms reminded me of being in somebody’s well-decorated home.

I was amazed and inspired to find that Jin Shin Jyutsu has been so well accepted and established throughout the hospital. In addition to the outpatient services offered to the local community, specially trained members of the Integrative Medicine department work throughout the hospital in many departments. Currently, Jin Shin Jyutsu is being offered in Intensive Care, the Emergency Room, Cardiac Care, Pediatric, Maternity, Respiratory, Pre- and Post-Op Surgery, Geriatrics and the Cancer unit. I was told that nearly 90% of patients with an extended stay at MMH will come in contact with and be able to receive additional treatments from the Integrative Medicine team, which includes Jin Shin Jyutsu. The passion of this hospital is to offer the highest level of patient care, which they feel includes powerful non-medical approaches, such as Jin Shin Jyutsu, yoga, meditation and nutrition, among others.

The Integrative Medicine team members go to the various departments and ask who needs additional assistance with their patients. It’s a very large hospital and the team never runs out of patients wishing to receive their care. Each of these patients receives a list describing each of the modalities offered, as well as a self-help Jin Shin Jyutsu sheet for them to begin using right away. With over 140 MMH employees having taken the Jin Shin Jyutsu 5-day training, awareness of the benefits of JSJ has become well known throughout the hospital. The wonderful work that is taking place at MMH displays the great potential Jin Shin Jyutsu has to offer to relieve suffering in a medical setting.

“Wisdom is love in action.” ~ Mary

Thank you, David.

Thank you, Mary.

Gassho, Namaste, Blessings

All issues of The Main Central Jin Shin Jyutsu Newsletter are available at http://www.jsjinc.net.

[If you are interested in bringing Jin Shin Jyutsu to a hospital near you, contact the Scottsdale office for more information.]

I’m thinking about appreciation…

APPRECIATION

“You can never get to peace and inner security without first acknowledging all of the good things in your life. If you’re forever wanting and longing for more without first appreciating things the way they are, you’ll stay in discord.”
— Doc Childre and Howard Martin

Develop an attitude of gratitude. We discover a sense of wholeness as we appreciate both the small and big things in our lives. And it really helps to remember to appreciate ourselves. Appreciation is more than just acceptance — it’s respect and admiration. Let go of criticism and self-abuse.

“Generally, appreciation means some blend of thankfulness, admiration, approval, and gratitude. In the financial world, something that ‘appreciates’ grows in value. With the power tool of appreciation, you get the benefit of both perspectives: as you learn to be consistently thankful and approving, your life will grow in value.”
— Doc Childre and Howard Martin

Copyright © 1999 – 2017 Higher Awareness Inc.
Edmonton, AB, Canada T5K 0K6

Morristown Memorial Hospital and Jin Shin Jyutsu, Part 1

David Burmeister writes about “Morristown Memorial Hospital and Jin Shin Jyutsu” in The Main Central Jin Shin Jyutsu Newsletter, issue Number 71, Winter 2011:

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[This is a very meaningful article to me personally. Now renamed Morristown Medical Center, I took most of my classes and workshops in this very place. The story of the evolution of JSJ here is amazing, from some volunteer work in the Cancer Center, what? 25 years ago…to the present where so many RNs are certified to practice JSJ and it is now allowed in many departments, even in a surgical suite! It works because it works. It is Jin Shin Jyutsu, the Creator’s Art-Effortless Reality; the Cosmic Artless Art of KNOW (Help) MYSELF. I am eternally grateful to Mary Burmeister, David Burmeister, the wonderful instructors and especially to Joanie Millspaugh and Debbie Burnet (Debbie #1). Going forward I will take my classes in Woodstock, NY, where I moved last September. I will miss my NJ friends and fellow students of 12 years, but am excited to be able to continue my studies here in New York…but enough of my blathering on and on…]

In 2011 David Burmeister wrote:

During this year’s annual Jin Shin Jyutsu (JSJ) organizer meeting, Joan Millspaugh, longtime friend and New Jersey organizer, shared some of the exciting news from Morristown Memorial Hospital (MMH). I’ve known that for nearly 20 years there has been an organized effort to bring Jin Shin Jyutsu to a place of prominence at MMH. Thanks to a bit of strong encouragement from Philomena, who has been working with the hospital during these many years, I decided to take my first opportunity to see what was happening with Jin Shin Jyutsu in Morristown.

Philomena’s three days of special topics October 30th through November 1st seemed like the perfect time for me to visit. I enjoyed her Mothers and Babies day, which was attended by several kids from the local community with pretty big labels. Philomena was able to work with the kids in private, while the rest of us observed via closed circuit camera in an adjoining conference room. This gave the children a space where they could relax and feel comfortable while a room full of enthusiastic JSJ students observed them. One child in particular, however, kept looking up into all the empty seats in the room hoping the audience would return. There’s a showman in every crowd!

After lunch, another local group of children, who are clients of practitioners already in class, were brought to the class by their parents. The children then received the talented jumper cables of Philomena and her students. It was a wonderful experience, one that was enhanced by the excellent facilities and technologies offered at MMH and by our very special organizers, Joan Millspaugh and Debbie Burnet.

That evening I was honored to join Philomena, Susan Schwartz, Anita Willoughby, Betsie Haar, Joan Millspaugh and Debbie Burnet for dinner at the home of Joan Brady, longtime supporter of the hospital, and the person largely responsible for introducing JSJ at MMH. I met Emilie Rowan, director of the Integrative Medicine program, along with many other people who were instrumental in establishing JSJ in their hospitals. It was a lovely gathering where many stories were shared about how JSJ touched lives, both through the work of Philomena and also by the community of JSJ practitioners at MMH.

To be continued…