Tree Pulses

For many years I studied and practiced Jin Shin Jyutsu but never “heard” body pulses with my hands. I asked several teachers, mentors and fellow students why I only felt temperature changes…cold to hot, and sometimes a sense of tingling between my hands…and those would suggest that “stuck” Safety Energy Locks were open and I could move my hands to the next step in a flow.

I was very discouraged and disheartened until….ta da! my friend Bara came to visit from Germany and she took me to a little park and showed me how to “hear” the pulses of a healthy tree and a tree in distress. The awareness finally came to me! Turns out I had been ‘hearing” body pulses all along but thought they were my own pulses.

It was a significant change…now I was able to use the Textbook flows as what they were intended to be; guidelines, a place to begin. “Hearing” the body pulses with my hands enabled me to treat the specific needs of any particular client at any given time! (I still keep the books handy!)

Cynthia Broshi shares part of her awareness and understanding with us in the Spring 2009, issue Number 64, of The Main Central Jin Shin Jyutsu Newsletter. You may obtain your own personal copy at http://www.jsjinc.net.

Tree Pulses

3rd depth (Spring) is “little s” source: the transformation of SOURCE (6th Depth) into a vibration that can build and nourish a living form. Its element is KEY (KI). Wood is another understanding of the element of 3rd depth: the amalgamation of air, fire, water and earth: living, growing beings.

Lately I’ve been listening to the Pulse in trees. I’m finding there’s a common quality shared by each tree of a particular species. As with people, a single tree expresses its pulse (its creation) differently according to season, time of day, and experience of the moment. Snapshots of the pulses of a few trees have arranged themselves into this poem:

Madrone: a smooth herd of horses cantering (slo-mo)

Oak: filigree-silk in sea wind lifting up into itself and unfurling

Summer Solstice, 2008, after the first winter so warm no snow fell in Riga, a pine’s respirations pulled translucent as saltwater taffy:

Inspiration: 13-20 seconds: a vigorous sucking root → leaf (question: is “up” the tree’s inhale?  its exhale?) billowing chiffon, a diaphanous virility up   up   up    pause        –         pause          –

Then expiration (?) (“down”): shorter: 9-12 seconds: sun-motes, diffuse after-thought, silting

Like the accretion of yellow pollen billows the Baltic’s edging

After hearing these qualities in the tree’s pulses, I asked a plant scientist to describe a tree’s respiration. She explained that a tree pumps fluid from root to leaf. (This is like our intake of food, as the fluid contains nutriments.) Some of this fluid (mostly water) evaporates through the leaves; this is how oxygen is released into the air. (Interestingly, Evaporation is a 3rd Depth activity.) Carbon dioxide, linked with light-energy of the sun, is inhaled by the leaves and flows downward, in-circulating and dispersing throughout the tree’s body.

Thank you, Cynthia.

Thank you, Mary.

Thank you, David.

Gassho, Namaste, Blessings

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3 thoughts on “Tree Pulses

  1. Bara

    Ah, my dearest Debbie – what a wonderful day that was! Actually, I was just telling another JSJer about that day… and we went right out and listened to some trees in the park.

    Reply
  2. Lily

    You had me immediately with your descriptions of tree pulses! There is so much we can learn from trees. I once heard/read somewhere that trees are human’s closest relative in the plant kingdom, and I agree.
    Thank you for sharing!

    Reply

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